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the law to deny the holocaust in many european countries. our notion of free speech, especially when it comes to religion, is not shared around the world. >> but is it changing? >> i think it is changing. as the world becomes smaller, we live in a globalized world, and people recognize as president obama said in his speech that someone with a phone camera can cause a stir around the world. we have to be able to adjust. we've got to be able to have a discourse and dialogue when it comes to difficult issues like this rather than take the streets and commit acts of violence. >> i found it interesting american muslims seem to be speaking to two audiences, in fact. on one hand you speak to muslims around the world, and you also speak to american society and trying to say not all muslims are like the people who are in the streets doing violence. has that been a challenge for you all? >> it is a difficult balancing act, but i think people realize that the majority of people out on the streets, they were a very small number. and amongst that small number the ones who committed acts of violen
question >> no, sir. no, sir. >> do you want a dead son-in- law, miss celie was recce keep advising him like you do. >> as the novel is based -- we are joined by the renowned author alice walker to further discuss the legacy. we will also speak about other writings, social and political activism in support of the palestinians and about the coming presidential election. alice walker, welcome to "democracy now!" it is great to be with you. yesterday your before a crowd of about 1200 people in the audience at the fall for the book festival in arlington, virginia. you read from "the color purple," and talked about its importance. tell us on this 30th anniversary this year, your thoughts about what brought you to write this work. >> i wanted to spend more time with my grandparents and they had died long ago. and my parents. so i set out to write a book in which i could literally live for year or two and be with them by creating characters who resembled them and by giving them a life they might have had, that in fact, many of them did not have. >> for especially young people who may not have
pressed and the full force of the law obviously needs to play on that. the bigger issue about how a democracy fashion as proper conversation in fragmented societies is something that i think is very, very profound. but if you think about it, the gridlock you complain about, we can't get agreement in our country about building a third runway in heathrow airport, much less care about the elderly swrenchts the same problem. >> there is gridlock on syria, there is grid lock on the saving of the eu, there is gridlock at the national politics, and representative politics is facing a very, very buying set of charges, people feel they are not getting a proper say. now, there are reforms in every country that are going to have to be particular to that country, but there is a more generic issue about how in a world of multiaccess to information we have a proper conversation about how to take our countries forward. >> it is good to see you. >> very nice to see you. >> david miliband, former foreign minister and now a member of parliament in great britain. thank you for joining us. see you ne
of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think that could be an argument for them in favor of delivering a clear and unified and strong message from the international community. >> rose: do you think it's a stalemate today? >> more or less it is a stalemate. with severe consequences for the people of syria. and i think the international community has a responsibility to deliver a very clear message to the assad regime that they must stop violence and initiate a process towards democracy in syria. no regime can in the long-term neglect the will of the people. >> rose: when you look at the balkans, we had an intervention without a u.n. resolution. nato acted without a u.n. resolution. can you imagine that happening in syria? >> testimony brief answer is no, but let me stress that nato acted on the basic of the principles of the u.n. charter when we took responsibility for the operation in kosovo. the operation aimed at preventing what we considered a genocide. b
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)